Dollars

RAGS TO RICHES


Clippers owner Steve Ballmer greets the fans as he is introduced at their home court at Staples Center in Los Angeles image www.acbocallcentre.com

Clippers owner Steve Ballmer greets the fans as he is introduced at their home court at Staples Center in Los Angeles. Photo: Wally Skalij

Speaking last month to a few hundred MBA students at the University of Southern California, Steven A. Ballmer, the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, broke into verse.

He recited a snippet of a song from the Broadway musical “Pippin”: “Rivers belong where they can ramble. Eagles belong where they can fly. I’ve got to be where my spirit can run free. Got to find my corner of the sky.”

It’s sort of a privilege, sort of a duty, sort of a burden. How do I make a difference? 

Steve Ballmer

Ballmer sensed his audience was more attuned to cloud computing, which he seeded while running Microsoft, than to Stephen Schwartz’s “Corner of the Sky.” And so he supplied some context, explaining how Pippin, the son of King Charlemagne, engaged in a lifelong quest for fulfillment.

Ballmer might have been talking about himself. Retired from Microsoft, where he was employed for 34 years, the last 14 as its chief executive, Ballmer has spent the first several months of his retirement pondering how to grow a personal legacy through philanthropy.

“What is it like to be rich beyond belief?” a student asked him.

Steve Ballmer's huge fortune grew from humble roots image www.acbocallcentre.com

Ballmer, a billionaire, answered: “It’s sort of a privilege, sort of a duty, sort of a burden. How do I make a difference?”

Eleven months ago, Ballmer won a bidding war for the Clippers. He bought the franchise for $US2 billion in what was considered part business transaction, part act of beneficence, after the Clippers’ longtime owner, Donald Sterling, incurred a lifetime ban by the NBA for making racist comments that were recorded and made public.

The official transfer in August of the team to Ballmer, whose Swiss-born father worked for the US Army as an interpreter in the Nuremberg war crimes trials, was seen as a clean break from the Clippers’ desultory past. In Ballmer, 59, the team acquired a loud and proud leader. He was more inclined to show his enthusiasm than his navel, unlike Sterling, who at Ballmer’s age was still wearing shirts unbuttoned to his waist.

Phoenix Suns forward Reggie Bullock said Ballmer drew attention in his own way on game nights.

“He has a very distinctive voice,” said Bullock, who was a Clipper until a trade in January. “It sounds like he’s howling at the moon.”

Deep pockets

With his manic enthusiasm and deep pockets, Ballmer was going to swoop in and pry Los Angeles from its decades-long love affair with the Lakers. That was the plan, anyway. But even though the Clippers finished with 35 more victories than the Lakers, they trailed their fellow Staples Center tenants in the local regular-season ratings.

The Clippers are a reflection of their new owner, all right. But it is not the goofy, giddy guy seen gyrating like a giant inflatable tube man near his baseline seat – most memorably during a January halftime performance by the singer Fergie that prompted real estate mogul Donald Trump to describe Ballmer as “an embarrassment to rich people.”

Ballmer emphasized to the USC students the need to be “tenacious and hard core” in the pursuit of their goals. It is a message his team seems to have absorbed. Matt Barnes and Blake Griffin were fourth and fifth in the NBA in technical fouls in the regular season with a combined 25. Nine Clippers had more technical fouls than any single player on the San Antonio Spurs, their first-round playoff opponent. The Clippers beat the Spurs, the defending NBA champions, in the opening game of the best-of-seven series. Game 2 is Wednesday night.

Ballmer commutes to games from his home in Seattle. He travels by private jet, explaining, “Time is our most precious commodity, and there are conveniences that wealth brings to essentially get you more time.”

It is one of Ballmer’s few outward displays of wealth. His wardrobe is more J.C. Penney than J.Crew. The security guard standing outside the Clippers’ locker room during one homestand marveled at how effortlessly Ballmer blended into the crowd on game nights.

For the mathematically gifted Ballmer, sports have always served as his main medium of communication. In high school, he said, the first varsity letter he earned was in track.

“The coach gave me one in 10th grade,” he said, “because a guy had made a scoring error and deprived us of a point. I was helping out as the manager and I discovered the error and the coach said, ‘I guess you scored a point for us in a meet,’ and gave me a letter.”

Harking back to his days as the manager of his high school basketball team, Ballmer sometimes attends Clippers practices and retrieves basketballs for the players during drills.

“I didn’t know what to expect,” Doc Rivers, the Clippers’ coach, said. “The guy’s worth $US24 billion. I have to think if I had $US24 billion I probably would be different. I hope not, but I probably would be. He’s the most normal $US24 billion guy I know.”

Circus style

At Microsoft, Ballmer was known as a charismatic speaker, the P.T. Barnum of the techie set.

During one company meeting at Safeco Field, he saw an employee snapping a picture with an iPhone from Apple, a competitor. He confiscated it and playfully pretended to stomp on it in a scene caught on the baseball park’s giant video screen.

In front of a roomful of people, Ballmer is at his communicative best: funny, engaging, expressive. In a sit-down interview in January, Ballmer rocked back and forth in his chair with his arms held stiffly at his sides as he answered questions.

Ballmer refused to make his wife, Connie, or three sons available to be interviewed. He also declared his youngest son’s high school basketball games off-limits to a reporter.

“Sports is the easiest thing for me to bond with the kids over,” he said. “Academically, I probably grind them a little more.”

After their games, Ballmer said, there is what he described as “the debrief,” which is a sacrosanct part of the drive home. He said: “I’ll ask, Where do you want to start? Are we going to start with the team’s performance, or your performance? Offense or defense? Then we go through the team, we go through him, every kid, how we think he did.”

Ballmer added, “The debrief of the game in our family is always as important as the game itself.”

With the Clippers, Ballmer took a more hands-off approach.

“He’ll say, ‘Is it all right to come in and say hi?'” Rivers said. “And I say: ‘You’re the owner. You can barge in.’ And I mean that. I tell him all the time, he made an incredible commitment. I want him to enjoy it. I want him to come and do whatever he wants. I want to hear his opinion. He’s smarter than me.”

Blue collar roots

Ballmer was raised outside Detroit, where his father, Frederic, was a manager at Ford Motor Co.

“When he was up, he was up,” Ballmer said of his father. “When he was mad, you knew it.”

He chuckled. “I think I’m a little like my dad. When I’m up, I’m up. When I’m down, I’m down.”

His family lived comfortably, he said, but was not well-off. He said he was able to attend private school with the help of academic scholarships.

“My dad was an immigrant who came here with nothing and worked his way up as a payroll clerk for Ford,” Ballmer said. “I’m going to guess he probably maxed out around $US45,000 a year.”

Ballmer said he did not believe his father finished high school.

“He never told us for sure whether he graduated or not,” he said. “Even in his last days, my sister and I tried to get him to ‘fess up.'”

Ballmer said his father spoke rarely of his interactions with the Nazi war criminals in Nuremberg.

“He saw a guy get hanged,” he said. “That did come back to him later in his life. When he was sort of older and closer to his own death, the visualization of seeing this guy hang. …” Ballmer’s voice trailed off.

‘You need to buy this team’

Rivers said he first crossed paths with Ballmer in 2008, during the SuperSonics’ last season in Seattle. Ballmer, a SuperSonics season-ticket holder, had seats next to the visitors’ bench.

When Boston came to town, Rivers, then the coach of the Celtics, said he turned to Ballmer and said, “Hey, you need to buy this team and keep it here.”

“Only if you coach the team,” said Ballmer, Rivers recalled.

“Well, that’s not going to happen,” Rivers said. “That was our introduction to each other.”

Ballmer did not remember the meeting. He clapped gleefully as the story was relayed to him.

“Doc doesn’t make things up,” he said. “That’s not his style.”

One of Ballmer’s first moves as owner was to award Rivers a $US50 million contract extension that runs through the 2018-19 season. Amid the chaos created by Sterling’s racist remarks, Rivers emerged as a calming presence. From his days at Microsoft, Ballmer recognized that he had a strong brand asset in Rivers.

“You’ve got to build an interesting product, have a brand that people can understand, try to build a product that can be successful,” Ballmer said. He added: “There’s a natural shorter product cycle because players get older. I think the notion that you have to be tenacious and hard core really applies. You can’t be ripping things up and starting over again.”

Not an A-team

Ballmer earned his undergraduate degree from Harvard, where he lived down the hall from Bill Gates. Ballmer attended Stanford Graduate School of Business for a year before dropping out to join Microsoft, which Gates had founded along with Paul Allen.

“When I joined Microsoft we were not an ‘A’ team,” Ballmer said. “We were doing some ‘A’ work because we had three ‘A’ players. We weren’t very deep. We had three or four guys, all guys who were amazing, and then we had a bunch of people who were mediocre or worse.”

The same could be said of Ballmer’s Clippers, who have an MVP-caliber player in point guard Chris Paul, a multifaceted offensive player in Griffin and a tough matchup in center DeAndre Jordan. The drop-off in talent after that is precipitous.

“We’re trying to get better,” Ballmer said. “We’ve got some of the most exciting players in the league. Our team is better than it was at the beginning of the year, no question.”

The Clippers are not Ballmer’s first flirtation with Los Angeles. Before he enrolled at Stanford, Ballmer – a second cousin of the comedian Gilda Radner, who died in 1989 – came here with the notion of breaking into the movie business.

“I thought it would fit well with my personality,” Ballmer said.

A summer spent reading scripts and parking cars at private functions for meal money convinced him otherwise.

“I got enough of a flavour to know the movie business probably wasn’t going to be a compelling enough thing for me to not go ahead and go back to Stanford,” he said.

At USC, a student in the audience stepped to the microphone, produced a billed cap and said: “Hi, Steve. How are you doing? I’m going to put this hat on real quick.”

Squinting from the stage, Ballmer said, “It looks good, but what is it?”

“It’s a Warriors hat,” the student smugly replied, referring to the Golden State team, which led the Western Conference in the regular season with 67 wins.

“Next!” Ballmer bellowed. “Go, Clippers! Go home, Warriors!”

The New York Times

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

WORLDS RICHEST TEEN POP STAR-JUSTIN BIEBER
Justin Bieber: named richest teen by People magazine.Justin Bieber: named richest teen by People magazine. Photo: Penny Stephens

PINK DIAMOND BLACK CORAL PENDANT HERE

After riding the fast road to fame in 2009, Justin Bieber has topped a People magazine list of the richest teen stars, pulling in $US53 million ($50.74 million) last year.

Both the singer and his bank balance enjoyed stellar success in 2010 with ventures such as his 3-D concert movie Never Say Never, his perfume line and record sales.

The 17-year-old has been at work non-stop since he found fame at the age of 14, and recently told the Hollywood Reporter he wanted to take some time off from touring and performing to focus on his home life and “grow up”.

US singer and actress Miley Cyrus.

World’s richest teens www.pinkbits.net

US singer and actress Miley Cyrus. Photo: AP

  • US singer and actress Miley Cyrus.
  • Canadian singer Justin Bieber.
  • Nick Jonas of the Jonas Brothers.
  • Actor Jaden Smith.
  • Actress Willow Smith.
  • Twilight actor Taylor Lautner.
  • Singer, Selena Gomez.

People’s richest teen list is based on 2010 earnings, and Hannah Montana star Miley Cyrus was not far behind Bieber, with a pay cheque of $US48 million ($45.95 million) for the year thanks to her recent world tour.

Cyrus’ ex-boyfriend Nick Jonas pulled in $US12.5 million ($11.97 million), followed by Will Smith’s kids – Jaden and Willow – who both banked an estimated $US9 million ($8.62 million) each.

PINK DIAMOND BLACK CORAL PENDANT HERE

Also on the cash countdown are Taylor Lautner ($US8.5 million/$8.14 million) and Selena Gomez ($US5.5 million/$5.27 million).

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha
November 24, 2010 12:48 PM PST

10. Digg: Where do we start?


It’s almost painful to write about the decline of social-news site Digg: A few years ago, founder Kevin Rose was mentioned in the same sentences as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Now, well, not so much.

The problems really started a little over two years ago, when Digg, having reportedly snubbed nine-figure buyout offers and fresh off a $28.7 million Series C funding round that CEO Jay Adelson said at the time was going to fuel a “major expansion effort,” was revealed to be losing money–lots of it. But it was in 2010 that the mess hit the fan. Its sorely-needed “Version 4” overhaul didn’t go over so well with its loyal community. There were not one, but two rounds of layoffs this year, meaning that the company is less than half the size it was when Adelson himself jumped ship in the spring.

As for Digg, it’s still alive under the auspices of new CEO Matt Williams (and founder Kevin Rose is still doing something there) , but the outlook isn’t too bright for this company with a long track of missed opportunities. There has perhaps not been a better example in years that sometimes entrepreneurs have to throw away idyllic dreams of changing the world and, to be blunt, take the money and run.

Photo by BusinessWeek

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/2300-1001_3-10005691-2.html?tag=mncol#ixzz17JVbnTaL

Received & published by Henry Sapiecha

Entrepreneurs

Meet The Fastest Growing Company

Ever

Andrew Mason figured out how to inject hysteria into the process of bargain hunting on the Web.

The result is an overnight success story called Groupon.

image
At least Mark Zuckerberg wrote a few lines of computer code at Harvard before he left to launch Facebook. Now Andrew Mason, a relaxed and lanky 29-year-old music major from Northwestern, has managed to build the fastest-growing company in Web history. Groupon represents what the dot-com boom was supposed to be all about: huge sales, easy profits and solid connection between bricks-and-mortar retailers and online consumers.

Groupon, a name that blends “group” and “coupon,” presents an online audience with deep discounts on a product or service. Act now, says the pitch: You have only so many hours before this offer expires. That’s a familiar come-on, but it’s coupled with a novel element: You get the deal only if a certain number of fellow citizens buy the same thing on the same day. It’s a cents-off coupon married to a Friday-after-Thanksgiving shopping frenzy.

What’s in it for the vendor–which might be a museum, a yoga studio or an ice cream shop? Exposure. Since the resulting revenue is not only discounted but shared (typically, 50/50) with Groupon, the vendor may scarcely break even on the incremental sales. But it now has customers who might never have thought of patronizing the business. Groupon gets its offers in front of eyeballs by buying ad space through Google ( GOOG news people ) and Facebook and via the word of mouth of its 13 million subscribers.

Video: Growing Groupon

Unlike so many dot-com rockets, Groupon is a real business. Occupying 85,000 square feet inside a rehabbed eight-story former Montgomery Ward warehouse in Chicago’s River North neighborhood, the company is on track to pass $500 million in revenue this year, according to a report Morgan Stanley ( MS news people ) put together to win some underwriting business. No technology stalwart–including Ebay, Amazon.com ( AMZN news people ), Yahoo ( YHOO news people ), AOL and Google–grew that big that fast. At just 17 months old this April Groupon boasted a $1.35 billion valuation when it raised $135 million, the biggest chunk of it from Digital Sky Technologies, the curious Moscow investment fund behind Facebook and Zynga. (Mason will not disclose his stake, which he says is less than 50%.) The only company to reach a $1 billion valuation faster was YouTube (now part of Google), founded in 2005 and still waiting to turn its first profit. Groupon broke into the black just seven months after inception.

// < ![CDATA[//

Mason’s model is transforming the way companies–especially smaller ones with limited marketing budgets–snag sales. In May Groupon sold 6,561 tickets to a King Tut exhibit in New York’s Times Square for $18 apiece, little more than half the list price. The campaign brought in $120,000 at virtually no marginal cost to the exhibit; Groupon pocketed about 50% for a day’s effort. The most popular item so far: a $25 ticket for a Chicago architectural boat tour sold for $12. In May Groupon moved 19,822 tickets in eight hours and split the $238,000 with the tour operator.

Groupon has charged into 88 U.S. cities and 22 countries, including Turkey and Chile. Hundreds of rivals, some with deep pockets, are springing up. With turf wars brewing from New York to Brazil, Mason has armed himself with 250 salespeople and 70 writers, many plucked from the Chicago improv scene, to concoct witty pitches for deals. “We want to do for local e-commerce what Amazon did for normal consumer goods,” he boasts.

Sourced & published  by Henry Sapiecha

This is a great article I just received via a newsletter from Jon in Australia

He operates a property investment system.

Anybody wishing to seek further info just needs to email me at

admin@acbocallcentre.com

I have copied it for readers & visitors of the ACBO stable of sites

to enjoy,  learn and perhaps motivate.

HE QUOTES

‘ACCIDENTAL MILLIONAIRE’

I just got back from a massive weekend in Sydney.

No it’s not what you are thinking, my party days are over, I was at the Global Real Estate Investor seminar.

Some might call that “work”, however for me, and I often say this, my work is pleasure.

Yes I really mean that, I love what I do.

But that’s not why I’m writing to you today, I want to tell you about a person I met at the seminar on the weekend.

Let’s call him, “The Accidental Millionaire.”

That’s one thing I love about my business, I get the opportunity to meet incredibly interesting people at events.

Let me tell you about this chance meeting…

A young gentleman caught my attention as I was speaking to a group of people on one of the breaks.

He came up to me and just handed me a glass of water.

He didn’t say much, I think it was along the lines of, “Looks like you might need this…”

He didn’t stay to be part of the group, he just handed me the glass of water and moved on.

At the lunchtime break I saw him walking my way and I simply stopped him to say, “Thank you for the glass water.”

He passed it off as being a small act of “nothing special” but then went on to ask me whether I had 10 minutes to spend with him, he wanted to run something by me.

Now, I’ve learnt a long time ago to never pre-judge anybody. You might think it’s quite easy to do but I can assure you it is in fact very difficult, and in some cases almost impossible.

To paint a picture for you, this guy was casually dressed, however I noticed that his clothes were very Italian-designer orientated. In other words, they looked expensive.

First, he complimented me on the event and the content, and then went on to tell me that he was serious about investing in the US market – but did not want to buy one house at the time, he wanted t o buy 100-200 houses all at once. He referred to the speakers comments about how large investors would buy direct from the banks at wholesale for deep discounts and quickly turn them around for huge profits.

Of course this immediately caught my attention and I started wondering who this guy was… and what has he done to put himself in a position to simply pull out big figures like that.

I wanted to find out if he was serious or just big-noting himself.

I told him I was impressed with his ambition and ability to think big, as well as putting it out there straight away.

Anyway, he told me that his current business was going great-guns and turning over in excess of $30 million per annum with a significant and healthy profit.

This guy is what I call a player.

It was obvious to him from what he had heard at the seminar that the US market was a big opportunity to make some very big returns on his capital and he was not just going to dabble with this – he was going to be very serious and strategic.

He openly told me that he had millions to invest and he was ready to go right now. I was more curious than ever to find out a little bit about his background.

It turns out that this guy is a massive fan of personal development and self-improvement philosophy. He was able to recite concepts and ideas from some personal development greats such as David Schwartz, the author of The Magic of Thinking Big (the first book he ever read), Napoleon Hill of  Think and Grow Rich… Zig Ziglar….. Jim Rohn….. Anthony Robbins….. Winston Churchill…. etc, etc, etc.

All of these success greats had great impact upon his journey to significant wealth.

I wanted to dig deeper into his psychology and find out what made him so successful.

Now this guy is turning over $30 million and he says to me that he didn’t actually feel as though he was hugely successful, he was just taking advantage of the opportunities that were being presented to him.

I think that’s very instructive, anybody from the outside looking in would definitely see him as a success, however he just saw himself as a person of action and taking advantage of opportunity… Interesting.

I wanted more specifics, so I asked him for 3 reasons that he thought had made him achieve the results that he had achieved…

He said three things…

  1. The ability to think big.
  2. The burning desire.
  3. Outcome driven.

I was curious about one thing… He didn’t mention his ability to take massive action. I quizzed him about this…

“Oh!” he said. “That comes naturally to me, I didn’t even think of that… But now that you mention it, I suppose that plays a big part in what I do.”

Now this is very instructive, and many millionaires such as this guy do this subconsciously… Meaning they don’t really know they’re doing it. That’s why it’s sometimes really difficult for a wealthy person to explain what makes them successful.

He has gotten himself to the stage where taking action is normal, natural and simply part of his process.

This is a big lesson for anyone who wants to be rich, wealthy and happy. Your actions have to become part of what you do daily, without thinking about it.

All this most likely developed for this guy during his time that he spent with the self-improvement greats – which obviously changed his psychology greatly.
There are big lessons here, let me summarise them for you…

  • Never pre-judge… Be curious about the people that you interact with. You never know who you might be talking to.
  • Add value… His gesture of giving me a glass of water was small in the scheme of things, but how often do people do that?
  • Mindset… It’s amazing that most millionaires have similar stories of learning from the great masters of the past.
  • The ability to think big… If you’re going to think, why not think big?
  • Burning desire… This is what underpins the philosophy of “Failure is not an option… Just a learning experience.”
  • Outcome driven… You’ll always find a way if you’re outcome-driven. You wont stop until you’ve reached your goal.
  • Action-orientated… Turn the often difficult task of action into something that comes naturally, easily and effortlessly.


So there you have it, a chance meeting with a self-proclaimed accidental millionaire.

PS – Things happen for a reason.

HOW MANY OF YOU OUT THERE RELATE TO THIS STORY…??

Sourced and published by Henry Sapiecha 11th Feb 2010


RAGS TO RICHES STORY

pile-cash-needs-cropping

Bio of Mike O’Hagan – Mini Movers

book3

Sponsored by the Maryborough Chamber of Commerce Qld

www.maryboroughchamberqld.com.au

For the first 10 years of Mikes work life he worked for 35 different employers. In his words “I’m a product of the many really bad, and the few good, employers I worked for”.

This background helped to influence Mike to “do it differently” in business.

His business career started with buying and selling goods as a second-hand dealer. 8 years later the entrepreneur in Mike surfaced when he launched a short distance furniture removal business. This evolved into MiniMovers. MiniMovers is today an innovative market leader, growing from an initial investment of $200 and a Ute,

www.youbeautute.com www.minimokes.com www.www-trader.com

to an annual turnover exceeding $30 million with over 450 employees. Today, Mike Chairs the Board of Directors with an experienced CEO running the Business.

Mike has recently been on various Government committees including a Small Business Advisory Panel to the Governor of the Reserve Bank of Australia. He is currently a Commissioner on the Australian Fair Pay Commission, charged with the responsibility of setting the minimum pay for workers in Australia. He is also on the Board of Directors, of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and the National Board of the Duke of Edinburgh Awards.

To keep “on the edge” he is also attending the EO/MIT Entrepreneurs Masters Program in Boston USA. He is a sought after key note speaker who shares a variety of business and thought provoking views over a range of topics. He can answer the questions while keeping you interested, inspired and empowered.

“My education at the very best school (of hard knocks) guarantees I’ll challenge many commonly held beliefs”.

Mike is a true entrepreneur and a business innovator, and you’ll find that his down-to-earth style is both compelling and contagious.

WHAT’S YOUR STORY?

button-mystory

Posted by Henry Sapiecha 28th Sept

flashing-bright-blue-line

RAGS TO RICHES STORY

pile-cash-needs-cropping

Bio of Mike O’Hagan – Mini Movers

book3

Sponsored by the Maryborough Chamber of Commerce Qld

www.maryboroughchamberqld.com.au

For the first 10 years of Mikes work life he worked for 35 different employers. In his words “I’m a product of the many really bad, and the few good, employers I worked for”.

This background helped to influence Mike to “do it differently” in business.

His business career started with buying and selling goods as a second-hand dealer. 8 years later the entrepreneur in Mike surfaced when he launched a short distance furniture removal business. This evolved into MiniMovers. MiniMovers is today an innovative market leader, growing from an initial investment of $200 and a Ute,

www.youbeautute.com www.minimokes.com www.www-trader.com

to an annual turnover exceeding $30 million with over 450 employees. Today, Mike Chairs the Board of Directors with an experienced CEO running the Business.

Mike has recently been on various Government committees including a Small Business Advisory Panel to the Governor of the Reserve Bank of Australia. He is currently a Commissioner on the Australian Fair Pay Commission, charged with the responsibility of setting the minimum pay for workers in Australia. He is also on the Board of Directors, of the Australian Institute of Management (AIM) and the National Board of the Duke of Edinburgh Awards.

To keep “on the edge” he is also attending the EO/MIT Entrepreneurs Masters Program in Boston USA. He is a sought after key note speaker who shares a variety of business and thought provoking views over a range of topics. He can answer the questions while keeping you interested, inspired and empowered.

“My education at the very best school (of hard knocks) guarantees I’ll challenge many commonly held beliefs”.

Mike is a true entrepreneur and a business innovator, and you’ll find that his down-to-earth style is both compelling and contagious.

WHAT’S YOUR STORY?

button-mystory

Posted by Henry Sapiecha 28th Sept

flashing-bright-blue-line